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DPP blames police for bungled Kagezi murder investigations

The director of public prosecutions (DPP) Mike Chibita has blamed police for the collapsed investigations into the assassination of state prosecutor Joan Kagezi, who was gunned down three years ago.
 
Chibita while addressing journalists at Uganda Media Centre today said police had followed a wrong track in the investigations thus giving the criminals space to cover their tracks.
DPP Mike Chibita
 
Kagezi was shot dead at about 7:15 pm on March 30, 2015 near her residence in Kiwatule, a city suburb as she drove home with her children. Kagezi had stopped at a fruit stall by the roadside where she normally stopped to purchase fruits, when assailants riding on a motorcycle, red in colour, stopped next to the parked vehicle and shot her twice in the neck and shoulder, through the widow on the driver's side.
 
The director of Criminal Investigations Directorate (CID), Grace Akullo, who, by coincidence was driving some distance behind Kagezi, was the first police officer on the scene. She coordinated the evacuation of the deceased to Mulago hospital where she was pronounced dead on arrival. Three children who were with her were unhurt.
 
Immediately after her death, a team of police officers led by the then inspector general of police Kale Kayihura arrested more than 50 suspects who were later released after the DPP advised that there was no evidence linking them to the crime scene.
 
Chibita says it is this following of the wrong track in the investigations that messed up the case - since the right tracks have since gone cold and covered.
 
"Remember when the late Joan was killed, there were a number of arrests actually. About 50 people were arrested, and about two files generated. but when we looked through the evidence, we realised that these could not have been the people. This, I think was part of what made it hard…the investigators followed a track which was not the right one. And every time you follow a wrong track, that means you’re missing the right one and then the tracks sometimes get covered", said Chibita. 

Chibita revealed that there are still leads that can help trace the people behind the assassination like telephone call records, bullets and fingerprints all recovered from the scene of crime. With all the available leads, the DPP says the current lack of forensic investigators in the police force has made all the leads useless.
 
"It is lack of resources I would say, forensic especially because in this day and age where there is mobile phone evidence and laptop evidence. If we had the sophisticated forensic resources and well trained investigators, I think we’d have been able to crack it by now", he added. 
 
On Friday, the DPP's office will hold a memorial lecture for Kagezi at Hotel Africana under the theme, "Combating International and Transnational Organised Crime; lessons learnt and best practices."  The main speaker will be the United Kingdom chief crown prosecutor Grace Onoruna.
 
At the time of her death, Kagezi was in charge of the International Crimes Division handling international crimes such as terrorism, war crimes, and human trafficking.
 
She was the lead prosecutor in the case of the July 2010 terror attacks in Kampala. Kagezi was also working with the police in the prosecution of the suspects in the spate of murders, robberies and terrorism in Busoga region and Kampala.

Comments

0 #1 Lakwena 2018-04-13 08:49
It is a pity people get killed but nobody gets to know who the killer/s is/are, except the killers themselves. But there must be haunted silent witnesses somewhere about this cases.

In my gut opinion, the assassins who gruesomely gunned down an unarmed woman, Joan Kagezi, are the same guys who assassinated Afande Kaweesi and Major Kiggundu.

We still do not know their (Joan, Kaweesi and Kiggundu) offenses for which these people were executed. But humanly speaking, it is heart breaking the way they were mercilessly mowed down in hails of bullets.

May their souls be at peace.
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+1 #2 WADADA rogers 2018-04-13 09:16
It is the danger of trusting our incompetent with responsibilities they are under equipped to investigate.

Many of the people who join police are those who have failed to make it elsewhere, why would they not deal with criminals in order to earn some extra money.

Besides, the Kagezi case was bound to collapse for obvious reasons, i dont beleive the killers were not well connected with the institution
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+2 #3 Ugthinker 2018-04-13 12:13
That’s what you get in the absence of a distinction between investigators, prosecutors and perpetrators.

That’s where Uganda today is, sadly! We can go cicirles but until that is addressed, we can only expect more of the same!
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0 #4 Lakwena 2018-04-13 15:52
But Observer Controller, unless it is deliberate, don't you see the "crowding out" of contributions by the old stories (thumbs) herein?
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-1 #5 Miki 2018-04-13 17:34
Mr. Chibita, why not go to owino, round up scores of those idle people, take them to Nalufenya, beat them senseless, tie some heavy objects on their private parts and force them to confess to the crimes.

Some of them could even be paid off to confess and act as witnesses against the others so that you get your convictions.

Case solved. For Kawesi's killers the round up should be at Kalerwe. Too many idle people there. Destination remains the same: Nalufeesa - sorry I meant to say Nalufenya. What a bunch of incompetents!
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+1 #6 gwok 2018-04-13 22:32
Quoting Miki:
Mr. Chibita, why not go to owino, round up scores of those idle people, take them to Nalufenya, beat them senseless, tie some heavy objects on their private parts and force them to confess to the crimes.

Some of them could even be paid off to confess and act as witnesses against the others so that you get your convictions.

Case solved. For Kawesi's killers the round up should be at Kalerwe. Too many idle people there. Destination remains the same: Nalufeesa - sorry I meant to say Nalufenya. What a bunch of incompetents!


My anatomy fails me here. I wonder, if the suspects are women, how would they hang those heavy things on their private parts?

Further, but quite out of this context, I continue to wonder whether women prostitutes have public or private parts. Please have your say.
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0 #7 Miki 2018-04-14 01:52
The people in Uganda's police force and the other numerous security apparatus are very creative.

They will find a way to hang those weights on any type of private parts regardless of the anatomy. Ask anybody who has had a layover in Nalufenya or those comically named 'safe houses'.

Didn't you hear that in some instances they had brutalized crocodiles and snakes they threatened to set upon obstinate suspects until they crack and confess? This stories were in Ugandan newspapers.
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0 #8 Jama 2018-04-14 14:14
That's why we went to the bush.
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