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Ugandan schools listed among Africa’s 100 best

Uganda has three schools on the list of the top 100 private and government schools in Africa, according to the latest rankings by the African Economist magazine.

The three are: International School in Uganda (Lincoln) in the 43rd position, Gayaza High School at 68th and Namilyango College at 73rd.

In the East African region, Uganda came second after Kenya that had seven schools on the list whereas Tanzania had two. However, South Africa was ranked the overall best with 35 schools on the list whereas Zimbabwe came second with 14 schools. Other ranked schools were in Nigeria, Senegal, Ethiopia, Namibia and Niger. Countries such as Chad, DRC, Somalia and Botswana eluded the list.

The surveyors selected the list of schools that had historical prominence at national and regional level.

“That is the reason most schools that featured on the list are also quite old; some started well before their corresponding countries became independent,” reads the survey report published in the magazine.

The survey then went over the list of a few hundred schools, selecting the schools that continued to lead at national and regional levels, especially in the past few years when there have been national and regional rankings for secondary or high schools. In addition to how the different schools have performed at national level, schools whose students win prestigious scholarships and fellowships at national and international levels earned points above those that did not.

On this, some schools had an advantage over others in that the data was readily available on their own websites or their Wikipedia pages. International schools are a case in point.

“Success of individuals did not translate into success of the school that that particular individual attended. For instance, Kofi Annan was not enough to have Mfantsipim School (Ghana) on the list. Performance of a school is much more than what one individual had done. Mfantsipim has done much more than nurturing a UN Secretary General,” reads the report

Meanwhile the report notes that private schools ranked better than government schools while international schools have taken Africa by storm.

ninsiima@observer.ug

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